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RSU Begins Summer Semester as Campus Reopening Continues

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Today, RSU began its next phase of reopening amidst a summer enrollment boom. This semester, RSU saw a 25.3% increase in students taking summer courses.

Earlier this spring, RSU President Larry Rice announced RSU would not charge students online course fees for all summer courses. “In a time of great uncertainty, we want students to be able to continue their education this summer,” said Rice in his announcement. Currently, RSU assesses an additional $80 fee per credit hour for online courses.

While most public colleges in Oklahoma waived one or more academic services fees, RSU was one of only two regional universities that waived all online course fees. This is according to the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education’s May 29 meeting agenda.

Course registration data from RSU suggests that the online course fee waiver had a positive effect on enrollment. This summer, 1,242 students were enrolled in summer courses; this represents a 251 student increase from 2019. For many students, this summer represents their first semester at RSU. 417 students were newly-admitted to the university.

Of the 1,242 enrolled students, 18 were exclusively enrolled in the summer intercession period in May.

RSU has since continued with its reopening efforts. According to a statement from the RSU Office of Public Relations, much of the university’s building were set to open today. While occupancy will be limited and common areas will still be restricted, most university offices will be open for students. This includes on-campus computer labs and RSU Testing Centers.

As a public health measure, RSU will be providing masks to prospective students, students, and campus visitors conducting business on campus.

Editor’s note: this story was updated at 9:55 AM on June 9, 2020, to reflect an updated headcount.

Jake Brillhart serves as the editor-in-chief for the Hillpost. He is a junior studying public affairs with a focus in media communications. He frequently covers stories related to state and local government and campus policy. After graduation, Brillhart plans to pursue a Master of Public Administration and begin a career in higher education.

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Academics

Gallery: Students Return To Campus for First Day

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An RSU freshman flashes a peace sign while walking from the Health Sciences Building. Photo by Jake Brillhart, the Hill News.
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Two RSU students walk from Loshbaugh Hall to the Dr. Carolyn Taylor Center after class. Students returned to class today for the fall semester. Photo by Jake Brillhart, the Hill News.
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RSU Announces #HealthyHillcats and Required Masks

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A student wears an RSU mask on RSU's Claremore campus. Photo from rsu.edu/coronavirus.

Earlier this past week, RSU finalized plans for the fall semester. As a part of its coronavirus response plans, RSU will require masks, end their fall semester online, and reduced dining capacity. This is a part of their #HealthyHillcat social campaign.

“We are less than a month away from the beginning of the fall semester and each passing day is a mixture of hopeful anticipation and new unexpected challenges. This year will look very different,” said RSU President Larry Rice

RSU joins a growing list of Oklahoma colleges requiring face coverings for the fall semester. Since June 30, RSU employees have been required to wear masks according to a new employee policy.

Students will be expected “to wear a mask inside University buildings and outdoors on campus when a social distance of at least six feet is not possible.”

RSU has moved forward with a recommendation to end their in-person semester early and finish online. Following Thanksgiving, RSU will transition to one week of online instruction and continue online for finals week.

While no decisions to change class schedules have been announced, the university’s webpage for the coronavirus resources suggests modifying upperclassmen courses for hybrid and online delivery is an option.

Dining facilities at RSU will operate a reduced capacity and are encouraging take-out options.

This is a developing story and will be updated as more information becomes available.

Editor’s note: this story was updated at 8:56 a.m. on July 20, 2020 to include a statement by RSU President Larry Rice.

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Allied Health Degree Becomes Fastest Growing Program at RSU

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RSU allied health students practice patient assessment and care. Students practice hands-on training as a part of their health sciences degree program. Photo courtesy of Brian Coley, RSU.

It is a story 29 years in the making and involves an Oklahoma Athletic Trainers Association Hall of Fame inductee. Brian Coley serves as the lead instructor for the Allied Health, B.S., program. Last year, Coley approached the School of Professional Studies with an idea to expand RSU’s offerings of health science degrees.

Coley spoke to School of Professional Studies Dean Susan Willis, and together, they worked to establish an allied health program that will prepare RSU students for a variety of healthcare careers and graduate degrees.

“I’m at a part of my career where I want to work with and teach students before they go onto their master’s,” described Coley. The allied health program offers options in athletic training, physical therapy, and occupational therapy and currently has over 90 declared students.

Licensure in Oklahoma as an athletic trainer requires individuals to possess a bachelor’s degree. However, an increasing number of athletic training positions are requiring master’s degrees. This is where Coley saw an opportunity.

“9% of our high schools [in Oklahoma] have certified athletics trainers,” said Coley. The demand for them is increasing. Over the next eight years, the United States Labor of Bureau Statistics expects the profession to grow by 19%.

Currently, only three Oklahoma universities offer a graduate degree in athletic training. Coley explained the curriculum for RSU’s allied health program aligns with the prerequisite courses for Oklahoma State University, University of Tulsa, and University of Central Oklahoma.

Courses RSU students will take include: Biomechanics, Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries, and Methods of Strength and Conditioning. Coley explained longterm plans to eventually embed a strength and conditioning certification into the degree. “We want to make sure they’re prepared,” said Coley, “there is a shortage in physical therapy.”

RSU student Nate Callis, front left, practices taping an injury in the Health Sciences Building. Photo courtesy of Brian Coley, RSU.

Mya Hilderbrand, a junior studying allied health, described her experiences in the program. “I took a sports medicine class in high school and really enjoyed it…. when I came to RSU they only had a fitness management degree, but it wasn’t what I wanted.

“Then, my sophomore year I heard RSU adopted the allied health program, and it offered the exact degree I wanted. So far, the program has been amazing. Professor Coley, the main director of the program, has done an amazing job.

“He is extremely informative and prefers to do a lot of hands-on activities, which important for this field of work. He also cares a great deal about his students and offers any help they may need,” said Hilderbrand.

Allied health students can expect a hands-on experience with opportunities for field experience. Whether a student is “in a clinic, on the sideline” or helping at the Hillcat Fun Run, they will have the opportunity to practice their skills. The end goal is students to “walk into their first [graduate] class, and they’re ready to go,” said Coley.

Students interested in the Allied Health, B.S., program should visit the Department of Health Sciences website or consult their academic advisor.

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